Tag: education

Modeling the Past: Photogrammetry and Anthropological Research

Modeling the Past: Photogrammetry and Anthropological Research

For my CAP project this year, I decided to do something at which I feel I’m particularly good: creating 3D models of artifacts found during CAP excavations. I have been using digital technologies to render 3D models for about three years now and have created […]

Creating a New Outreach Activity

Creating a New Outreach Activity

Those who follow us know that outreach is a big part of what we do in the Campus Archaeology Program. Every year, CAP participates in several public outreach events including Michigan Archaeology Day, Grandparents University, ScienceFest, and more. These events are important because it gives […]

Summer 2018 Recap

Summer 2018 Recap

This summer was an eventful one for the Campus Archaeology Program field crew! We monitored construction, conducted several pedestrian and shovel test surveys, excavated one test unit, conducted lab analysis, and helped with the IB STEM archaeology camp and grandparents university. Plus, we uncovered an entire cow skeleton! Below you can read in more detail about each project.

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Four Pickles for Dinner? Trials and Tribulations of Archival Research and Tips for Success

Four Pickles for Dinner? Trials and Tribulations of Archival Research and Tips for Success

History is fleeting yet enduring. We hardly ever realize that we are making it, but the remnants of our historic actions can sometimes remain long after they are done. Things casually jotted down, random papers and notes tucked away—these are items we don’t realize that […]

Expecting the unexpected for summer construction projects

Expecting the unexpected for summer construction projects

As students begin to file out of campus, the orange cones start lining up as a sign of the upcoming summer construction projects. This will be my second summer as Campus Archaeologist and I feel much more prepared this year to expect the unexpected. We’ve […]

MSU at the Society for American Archaeology 2015

MSU at the Society for American Archaeology 2015

In a couple weeks, from April 15 to April 18, the Society for American Archaeology Annual Conference will be occurring in San Francisco, CA. There is going to be great representation of members of Campus Archaeology and the MSU Anthropology Department.

Daggett, Adrianne

[140] SYMPOSIUM: CHRONOLOGY, EXCHANGE, IDENTITY: ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF GLASS BEADS FOR ASSESSING REGIONAL INTERACTION

  • Room: Continental Parlor 3
  • Date and Time:Thursday, April 16, 6:00 PM – 8:30 PM
  • Role: Chair

Frederick, Kathryn

[139] GENERAL SESSION: EXPERIMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY

  • Room: Golden Gate 4
  • Date and Time: Thursday, April 16, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
  • Role: Presenter (7:oo PM)- Holes: The Beginners Guide to Food Caching (received Honorable Mention for the SAA Student Paper Award)

Goldstein, Lynne

[71] FORUM: GENDER DISPARITIES IN RESEARCH GRANT SUBMISSIONS (Sponsored by SAA Board of Directors)

  • Room: Continental Parlor 2
  • Date and Time: Thursday, April 16, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
  • Role: Moderator and Discussant

[235] SYMPOSIUM: CURRENT PRACTICE IN DIGITAL PUBLIC & COMMUNITY ARCHAEOLOGY

  • Room: Union Square 13
  • Date and Time: Friday, April 17, 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
  • Role: Presenter (2:30 PM)- Digital Public Archaeology Reconsidered: Lessons from Michigan State University’s Campus Archaeology Program

[301] SYMPOSIUM: PEOPLE THAT NO ONE HAD USE FOR, HAD NOTHING TO GIVE TO, NO PLACE TO OFFER: THE MILWAUKEE COUNTY INSTITUTION GROUNDS POOR FARM CEMETERY

  • Room: Continental Ballroom Parlor 8
  • Date and Time: Saturday, April 18, 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
  • Role: Discussant

Kooiman, Susan

[280] SYMPOSIUM: GREAT LAKES ARCHAEOLOGY: CURRENT RESEARCH AND PERSPECTIVES

  • Room: Yosemite A
  • Date and Time: Saturday, April 18, 8:00 AM – 10:30 AM
  • Role: Presenter (9:00 AM)- Pottery Function, Cooking, and Subsistence in the Upper Great Lakes: A View from the Middle Woodland Winter Site in Northern Michigan

Meyers Emery, Katy

[5] FORUM: DIVERSE DIGITAL ARCHAEOLOGIES – A CAA-NA & DDIG EVENT (Sponsored by DDIG and CAA-NA)

  • Room: Union Square 25
  • Date and Time: Thursday, April 16, 8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
  • Role: Discussant

Schnell, Joshua

[204] POSTER SESSION: ADVANCES IN BIOARCHAEOLOGICAL METHODS

  • Room: Grand Ballroom A
  • Date and Time:Friday, April 17, 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM
  • Role: Presenter- Three-Dimensional Osteometry: A Comparative Study of 3D Model Generation Techniques for Cranial Osteometry

Watrall, Ethan

[200] SYMPOSIUM: MACROSCOPIC APPROACHES TO ARCHAEOLOGICAL HISTORIES: INSIGHTS INTO ARCHAEOLOGICAL PRACTICE FROM DIGITAL METHODS

  • Room: Golden Gate 3
  • Date and Time: Friday, April 17, 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
  • Role: Discussant

[235] SYMPOSIUM: CURRENT PRACTICE IN DIGITAL PUBLIC & COMMUNITY ARCHAEOLOGY

  • Room: Union Square 13
  • Date and Time: Friday, April 17, 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
  • Role: Chair and Presenter (1:30 PM)- MBRIA: A Platform to Build, Serve, and Manage Mobile Public Heritage Experiences

Poster Session Featuring Jodie O’Gorman, Frank Raslich, Nicole Raslich, Nicole Silva, Andrew Upton and Jessica Yann

[365] POSTER SESSION: NEGOTIATING MIGRATION AND VIOLENCE IN THE PRE-COLUMBIAN MID-CONTINENT

  • Room: Grand Ballroom A
  • Date and Time:Saturday, April 18, 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
  • Poster Presentations

365-a Jodie OGorman, Michael Conner and Nicole Silva—Negotiating Migration and Violence in the Pre-Columbian Mid-Continent: A View from the Village

365-b Timothy Horsley, Michael Conner and Jodie O’Gorman— Understanding Settlement Organization through Geophysical Survey at the Morton Village Site, IL

365-c Andrew Upton, Jodie O’Gorman, Michael Conner and Terrance Martin—The Role of Public Space in Identity Making at Morton Village (11F2) 304 Program of the 80th Annual Meeting Saturday Afternoon, April 18

365-d Jessica Yann, Jeff Painter and Michael Conner—The Spatial Distribution of Domestic Facilities in the Multiethnic Morton Village Site

365-e Michael Conner, Jodie O’Gorman and Nicole Silva—Introduction to the DMM-MSU Morton Village Project 365-f Ryan Maureen Tubbs, Jodie A. O’Gorman, Jeffrey M. Painter and Terrance J. Martin—Negotiating Identity through Food Choice in the Pre-Columbian Mid-Continent

365-g Frank Raslich, Jodie O’Gorman and Michael Conner—Coming Together: Evidence of Ritual and Public Space as a Mechanism of Social Integration

365-h Jennifer Bengtson, Jeffrey Painter, Frank Raslich, Nikki Silva and Andrew Upton—Migration and Cohabitation at Morton Village: Future Research Directions

Campus Archaeology and Outreach: MSU Science Festival

Campus Archaeology and Outreach: MSU Science Festival

My previous posts this semester have focused on Campus Archaeology’s involvement in community and educational outreach and the pros and cons of these types of activities. Last Friday, members of Campus Archaeology gave an in-school presentation for MSU Science Festival at East Olive Elementary in […]

Planning for Summer Construction

Planning for Summer Construction

This coming Thursday CAP has a meeting with MSU Infrastructure Planning and Facilities (IPF) and Granger construction to discuss the upcoming summer construction projects. Most importantly, Phase 4 (final phase) of the North Campus Infrastructure Improvement, a.k.a the steam tunnel project. This project began in […]

CAP interns where are they now-Part I

CAP interns where are they now-Part I

Campus Archaeology is proud that we can give undergraduate students at MSU such an intensive, hands-on experience in archaeology. Our interns are given the opportunity to immerse themselves in every aspect of archaeology, from the research, to the lab work, all the way to full-scale excavations. Because of this, our interns continue in their careers/studies with a solid background in archaeology. We always like to keep up with what our previous interns are up to and get their feedback on how well CAP prepared them for their future careers. Kaitlin Scharra and Bethany Slon are two such previous interns, check out what they are up to.

Kaitlin Scharra

Katie Scharra and Katy Meyers working on the West Circle Steam II project
Katie Scharra and Katy Meyers working on the West Circle Steam II project

I graduated from MSU in December 2012.  During the following spring and summer, I was both a Laboratory Intern and Summer Survey Crew Member with Campus Archaeology.  My focus during my time as a Laboratory Intern was on creating a functional classification for the artifacts from Saint’s Rest.  The aim was to create an interpretation of the collection that the public could identify and engage with.  Creating this personal bridge between the artifacts and the public became very important to me at this time and is now my biggest motivation.

After deciding to move to Detroit to be closer to my family, I was encouraged to check out Wayne State University’s program by none other than Kate Frederick.  I was fortunate enough to join the Unearthing Detroit project.  This is a collections-based research project which reanalyzes collections recovered from the salvage digs in the mid-1900s. Our biggest and most researched collection comes from the construction of the Renaissance Center.  Like the collections at Michigan State, these are historic artifacts dating to the 19th Century.  They are the artifacts from family households, hotels, a marketplace, bars, and boarding homes for the working class of trade commerce on the river and the Grand Trunk Railroad.  The area, which is only about the size of  West Circle, tells us the story of a very diverse and continually changing community.  I also have enjoyed being able to compare this urban collection to that of my work in the Campus Archaeology collection.  It really illustrates the differences between urban and rural settings in the 1800s.

My main job on the Unearthing Detroit team is to develop public outreach.  This means I am the one who writes our weekly blog series, develops our face-to-face programs, and is constantly interacting with the public and other programs through social media.

This fall I will be beginning my Master’s in Anthropology here at Wayne State.  I will be exploring the different avenues of public outreach.  I hope to discover what are the advantages and disadvantages of public outreach and work towards creating efficient and useful methods.

You can follow the work of me and the Unearthing Detroit team through our blog, http://unearthdetroit.wordpress.com/, on twitter @UnearthDetroit, and our Facebook.

 

Bethany Slon

I had the pleasure of working with CAP for two years, but sadly I had to say goodbye to the team last month, in order to pursue my research interests. Right now I am spending five months in Central Mexico, where I am assisting a Ph.D. student from the University of California Riverside with an excavation of a pre-Aztec elite residence.

Bethany working at her new site in Mexico
Bethany working at her new site in Mexico

We’ve only been digging for a couple of weeks, so a lot of what we are going to find is unclear, but I can say for sure that all of my experiences with CAP have really prepared me for what I’ve been here. I’m used to being on the digging side of things, but here I was entrusted to managing my own section of the excavation. This means that I have to use everything I’ve learned with CAP to make sure everything is perfect in regards to correct archaeology. This includes setting up grid units, taking substantial field notes, and directing my crew in ways that will be most efficient to the excavation. Thankfully. Campus Archaeology has taught me everything I need to know, and I will forever be thankful for the time I got to spend with CAP. As for future plans, I’ll be applying to graduate school while in Mexico, and I hope to be entering a graduate program in the fall of 2015.

Perceptions about Archaeology

Perceptions about Archaeology

As the only non-archaeologist graduate fellow in Campus Archaeology Program (I am a medical anthropologist in training), I wanted to investigate the attitudes that others outside the discipline have toward archaeology. Interestingly enough, when I tell people I am an anthropologist, it is usually assumed […]