Tag: archaeology

Modeling the Past: Photogrammetry and Anthropological Research

Modeling the Past: Photogrammetry and Anthropological Research

For my CAP project this year, I decided to do something at which I feel I’m particularly good: creating 3D models of artifacts found during CAP excavations. I have been using digital technologies to render 3D models for about three years now and have created […]

Getting to the Root of History: Reviving Past Crops with the Student Organic Farm

Getting to the Root of History: Reviving Past Crops with the Student Organic Farm

For the past several years, the Capturing Campus Cuisine project has resulted in some wonderful collaborations and outreach opportunities between CAP and other MSU programs. Our partnership with MSU Culinary Services has resulted in a successful historic luncheon reconstruction and “throwback” meals with the MSU ON-THE-GO […]

MSU at the Midwest Archaeological Conference

MSU at the Midwest Archaeological Conference

Next week is the annual Midwest Archaeological Conference (October 4-6, 2018) in Notre Dame. Below is a list of dates and times of all MSU presentations, posters, and discussants. Included in these are two posters on Campus Archaeology projects that you should check out!

Friday, october 5

9 am – 12:15 pm Symposium
Storing Culture: Subterranean Storage in the Upper Midwest (Auditorium)

9:15 am – Now and Later: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Hunter-Gatherer Food Storage Practices by Kathryn Frederick (former Campus Archaeologist)
12 pm – Discussant, Dr. William Lovis

10 am – 12 pm General Poster Session
Reports from the Field (Room 210-214)

Archaeology along the Banks of the Red Cedar: Summary of 2018 Riverbank Survey by Jeffrey M. Painter, Autumn M. Painter, and Jack A. Biggs (Campus Archaeology Program)

1:30 pm – 4:30 pm General Poster Session
Materials and Methods (Room 210-214)

Historic Cuisine on the Go: A Campus Archaeology Program and MSU Food Truck Collaboration by Autumn M. Painter and Susan M. Kooiman (Campus Archaeology Program)

Saturday, october 6

9 am -11:45 am General Session
Middle Mississippian to Late Prehistoric Lifeways (Auditorium)

11:30 am – A Revised History of the Late Precontact and Historic Era Occupations of the Cloudman Site by Susan M. Kooiman and Heather Walder

1:30 pm – 4 pm General Session
Landscape, Settlements, and Their Detection (Room 100-104)

3:45 pm – Trade Relationships of 18th-Century Ottawa along the Grand River, Michigan by Jessica Yann

 

The Sweet Side of History: Investigating an Old MSU Sugar House

The Sweet Side of History: Investigating an Old MSU Sugar House

Speaking as a person with a serious sweet tooth, maple syrup may be one of the greatest products of nature. It is tasty, versatile, and can be made by anyone with enough maple trees and a hot flame. It also has been a part of […]

Summer 2018 Recap

Summer 2018 Recap

This summer was an eventful one for the Campus Archaeology Program field crew! We monitored construction, conducted several pedestrian and shovel test surveys, excavated one test unit, conducted lab analysis, and helped with the IB STEM archaeology camp and grandparents university. Plus, we uncovered an […]

Meet the 2018 CAP Fellows

Meet the 2018 CAP Fellows

The 2018-2019 school year has begun!  Dr. Stacey Camp has taken over as director of the program, following Dr. Lynne Goldstein’s retirement from MSU. We will be continuing to work on several ongoing projects, as well as begin several new ones. Please meet our 2018-2019 CAP group!

CAMPUS ARCHAEOLOGY PROGRAM DIRECTOR:

Dr. Stacey Camp, CAP Director
Dr. Stacey Camp, CAP Director

Dr. Stacey Camp: I’m Dr. Stacey Camp, the new Director of the MSU Campus Archaeology Program. I’m excited to take over for Dr. Lynne Goldstein and am looking forward to working with our new and seasoned CAP Fellows. We have a good deal planned for this year, including focusing on publishing our research, training in social media, and working with our robust archaeological collections. We will also continue to do our favorite outreach events, including Apparitions and Archaeology, Michigan Archaeology Day, partnering with the MSU Food Truck, and MSU Science Fest. We will be having a Campus Archaeology Program field school next summer, which we will post about on our social media. I am excited to see where this year takes us!

Campus Archaeologist

Autumn Painter, Campus Archaeologist
Autumn Painter, Campus Archaeologist

Autumn Painter: Autumn is a fourth year Ph.D. student in the Department of Anthropology. This May, Autumn began her first term as the Campus Archaeologist. Her research focuses on prehistoric foodways and social interaction through the analysis of animal bones in the Midwestern United States. This year Autumn will be working with other fellows on their projects, promoting our new social media campaign, and working to complete reports from past excavations.

Campus archaeology program fellows: 

Mari Isa, CAP Fellow
Mari Isa, CAP Fellow

Mari Isa: Mari is a fifth year Ph.D. student in Anthropology. For her dissertation research, she studies the effect of biological and mechanical factors on skeletal fracture patterns. Mari is also involved in a bioarchaeology project investigating the potential social and biological impacts of malaria in Early Medieval Tuscany. Mari is excited to be returning for her third year as a CAP fellow. She hopes to work on various projects including developing new outreach activities that will allow CAP to engage people of all ages with archaeology and with our research on MSU’s campus.

Jeff Burnett, CAP Fellow
Jeff Burnett, CAP Fellow

Jeff Burnett: Jeff is a first year Anthropology PhD. student and a half-time CAP fellow. His past studies have focused on the archaeology of the African Diaspora in North America, with an interest in the process of freedom and how social constructs effect lived experiences. He is also interested in the production of historical knowledge and the utility of collaborative archaeology to diversify this production. Jeff is excited to join the Campus Archaeology Program, hoping to learn from their tradition of public archaeology and outreach in their community.

 

Jack Biggs, CAP Fellow
Jack Biggs, CAP Fellow

Jack Biggs: Jack is a fifth year Anthropology Ph.D. student and a returning CAP fellow.  His research is focused on growth and development of the ancient Maya of Central America and how social identity and childhood affect an individual’s biology.  He is also a big proponent of using 3D modeling (via photogrammetry) as a teaching and curation method and will be creating models of artifacts from CAP excavations so that they can be digitally preserved.

 

Jeff Painter, CAP Fellow
Jeff Painter, CAP Fellow

Jeff Painter: Jeff Painter is a fifth year Ph.D. student at Michigan State University who is returning for his third year as a Campus Archaeology Fellow. He is a prehistoric archaeologist focused on foodways, ceramics, and migration in the late prehistoric Midwest. This year, his CAP research project will focus on the historic sawmill/sugar house on MSU’s campus.

 

 

Amber Plemons: Amber is a third year Ph.D. student in the Department of Anthropology, focusing in Biological Anthropology. Her research focuses on understanding the causative forces of human variation in craniofacial morphology, specifically the impacts of climate and genetics. This year, Amber will be working to build a database for artifacts recovered across Michigan State University. This database will allow information of all previously recovered material to be housed in a central location with their temporal and geographic location information, artifact type, and images, making future research more readily available.

Susan Kooiman, CAP Fellow
Susan Kooiman, CAP Fellow

Susan Kooiman: Susan is returning for her final semester as both a Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology and a CAP fellow. Her dissertation research focuses on pottery use, cooking practices, and diet of precontact Indigenous groups in the Upper Great Lakes of North America. This year, she will be finishing up the Campus Foodways project, a collaborative investigation (with Autumn Painter) into the archaeology and history of food at MSU. This includes expansion of collaborations with the MSU Food Truck and MSU Student Organic Farm,  and disseminating the results of the project through publication, conference presentations, and other outreach opportunities.

 

Big Changes Coming in MSU Campus Archaeology’s Future

Big Changes Coming in MSU Campus Archaeology’s Future

The 2017-18 academic year will be a momentous one for MSU Campus Archaeology. We are now an established entity in the University with our own budget and clear goals, but as of May 2018, I (Lynne Goldstein) will be retiring from MSU, and the MSU […]

CAP Interns: Where are they now Part II

CAP Interns: Where are they now Part II

Ryan Jelso To be part of the Campus Archaeology team had been a goal of mine since my very first month on campus. I remember one of my professors taking out class on a walk to one of CAPs excavations and I found it really […]

Blogging Campus Archaeology: A Retrospective

Blogging Campus Archaeology: A Retrospective

This is the fourth post as part of the Blogging Archaeology Carnival hosted by Doug’s Archaeology. To learn more about this, please see our first post: Why do we blog?, our second post: The Good, Bad and Ugly, and our third post: Our Best Posts

This month, the question from Doug’s Archaeology for the carnival is a little bit different: there isn’t one. Instead, he proposes that we write on whatever we want to in relationship to blogging archaeology.

I’ve been blogging for Campus Archaeology since September 2010- that’s three and a half years of writing for the same organization as it developed and changed. When I first started, it was in my first year as a graduate student in MSU’s Department of Anthropology. I was working under the guidance of Campus Archaeologist, Chris Stawski, and had a number of projects focusing on GIS and public outreach. The following two years, I was the Campus Archaeologist and worked with a team of graduate and undergraduate students. This year, Kate Frederick is the Campus Archaeologist, and I’m continuing to work on the GIS and help with the accession of our artifacts. Over this time, its been interesting watching the blog develop and change from a medium for communicating dig locations and excavations, to a more robust forum for discussion and community sharing.

Campus Archaeology in June, 2009
Campus Archaeology in June, 2009

The blog on this website first started in March 2009 when the new Campus Archaeology website launched. Prior to that, the blog was held on the first Campus Archaeologist’s own website. The ‘new’ blog in 2009 began with posts primarily by Terry Brock that reviewed the basics of archaeology, as well as reviews and announcements of digs and surveys occurring on campus. A second author came on to write almost a year later in April 2010. Throughout this first period, the focus on the blog was informing the public about finds and upcoming digs.

Campus Archaeology September, 2012
Campus Archaeology September, 2012

Beginning in 2011, a team of graduate student fellows began publishing a variety of articles on the blog about their individual research into different aspects of Campus Archaeology and historic MSU. My own first post came on February 7, 2011 and was about developing a more robust GIS for Campus Archaeology. Looking back, its funny to see how my own individual writing and style has changed so much! While there was an increase in people blogging, the posts were only going up every couple weeks, or in response to digs occurring. In the Fall of 2011, blog posts started going up twice a week, undergraduate interns began posting on the main blog site (we integrated their posts instead of keeping them separate), and we had more graduate students involved.

 

Campus Archaeology June, 2013
Campus Archaeology June, 2013

Since starting the new site, there have been four different Campus Archaeologist’s sharing information on digs, surveys, and the work occurring within the program, 13 different graduate fellows sharing their research projects and updates from the field, 15 undergraduate interns who are writing about their archival work, individual projects, and experiences learning archaeology through doing. We’ve had an amazing range of posts that show the importance of archaeology, especially to the university. Blogging isn’t just about sharing our work; it is an important part of learning to communicate complex archaeological concepts to a non-specialist audience.

Campus Archaeology began as a blog that shared archaeological excavations and skills. While that continues to be a focus of our work, readers can now see the full range of work that archaeologists do, from the hours spent in archives before the dig to the hours spent analyzing artifacts and digitizing maps after the dig. As new people join each semester, the foci change, the research shifts, and the blog changes. It will be interesting to watch it continue to develop and grow.

A comment from Lynne Goldstein, Director of Campus Archaeology: It has been amazingly rewarding to watch Campus Archaeology develop over time, expanding its range, participants, and audience. I don’t blog very often, but, from the beginning, I am always watching and monitoring what we do and how we do it. One of our goals is to develop a strong and innovative program here and to serve as an example for other campuses who want to try and do something similar to what we have been able to accomplish. We look forward  to the future of the past!

Beal Street Entrance Construction and Survey

Beal Street Entrance Construction and Survey

You may have noticed that the area around Michigan Avenue from Harrison Road to East Grand River  Road is completely covered with construction equipment, orange cones, and various people in neon yellow. In a half mile radius there are three different construction projects that are […]