MSU @ SAA 2017

Next week, from March 29th – April 2nd, the 82nd Annual Society for American Archaeology meeting is taking place in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.  This year we have many MSU faculty and students presenting their work.  Make sure to swing by their talks, posters, and lightening session. The full meeting program can be found here.

CAP director Dr. Lynne Goldstein is receiving two SAA Presidential Recognition Awards.  One for her work on the Task Force on Gender Disparities in Archaeological Grant Submissions, and the other for her work on the Task Force on Guidelines for Promotion and Tenure in Diverse Academic Roles.  Congratulations Dr. Goldstein!  Learn more about each task force in the full meeting program. The award ceremony follows the annual business meeting, Friday March 31st at 5:30 PM.

Rebecca Albert (undergraduate)

Thursday –

  • Symposium: Some Like It Hot: Analytic Diversity and Complementarity in the Exploration of Past Cooking and Cuisine
  • Time – 9:45 AM
  • Room: East Meeting room 18 (VCC)
  • Paper: A-Maize-ing: Phytolith Evidence for an Early Introduction of Maize in the Upper Great Lakes Diet
  • Co-authors: Caitlin Clark, Susan Kooiman, and William Lovis
  • Note – this paper won the Institute for Field Research  (IRF) and SAA Undergraduate award

Autumn Beyer

Saturday –

  • Symposium: General Session, Archaeology in the American Midwest II
  • Time- 10:30AM
  • Room: East Meeting Room 20 (VCC)
  • Paper: Power and Purpose: The Role of Animals in Ritual Context at a Mid-Continental Site in the Fourteenth Century
  • Co-authors: Terrance Martin and Jodie O’Gorman

Lisa Bright

Saturday –

  • Poster Session: North America – California
  • Room: East Exhibit Hall B Poster Entrance (VCC)
  • Time – 10:30AM – 12:30PM
  • Poster: A Different Kind of Poor: A Multi-Method Demographic Analysis of the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center Historic Cemetery
  • Co-author: Joseph Hefner

Sunday –

  • Lightning Rounds – Institution for Digital Archaeology Method and Practice Project Reports.
  • Time – 8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
  • Room: East Meeting Room 7 (VCC)
  • Role: Discussant

Brian Geyer

Thursday-

  • Symposium: Methods and Models for Teaching Digital Archaeology and Heritage
  • Time – 8:30 AM
  • Room: East Meeting Room 8 (VCC)
  • Paper: “LEADR at MSU: A Lab Approach to Digital Cultural Heritage in the Classroom”
  • Co-author: Brandon Locke

Dr. Lynne Goldstein:

Thursday –

  • Symposium: Archaeological Epistemology in the Digital Age
  • Time – 8:00am
  • Room: East Meeting Room 17 (VCC)
  • Paper: “Thinking Differently? How Digital Engagement, Teaching, and Research Have Influence My Archaeological Knowledge”

Sunday-

  • Lightning Rounds – Institution for Digital Archaeology Method and Practice Project Reports.
  • Time – 8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
  • Room: East Meeting Room 7 (VCC)
  • Role: Moderator

Susan Kooiman

Thursday –

  • Symposium: Some Like It Hot: Analytic Diversity and Complementarity in the Exploration of Past Cooking and Cuisine
  • Time – 8:00AM – 11:00 AM
  • Room: East Meeting room 18 (VCC)
  • Role: Chair
  • Paper: Cooking and Cuisine: Culinary Clues and Contexts in the Archaeological Record (8:00 AM)
  • Paper: Beer, Porridges, and Feasting in the Gamo Region of Souther Ethiopia (9:15), co-author

Alice Lynn McMichael (LEADR Assistant Director)

Sunday –

  • Lightning Rounds – Institution for Digital Archaeology Method and Practice Project Reports.
  • Time – 8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
  • Room: East Meeting Room 7 (VCC)
  • Role: Discussant

Jeff Painter

Thursday –

  • Symposium: General Session, Archaeology in the American Midwest I
  • Time – 3:30PM
  • Room:East Meeting Room 4 (VCC)
  • Paper: Foodway Variability in the Oneota Tradition: A Pilot Study of Cooking Pots
  • Co-author: Jodie O’Gorman

Dr. Jodie O’Gorman

Friday –

  • Symposium: Blood in the Waters: Violence in the Mississippian and Late Prehistoric Eastern Woodlands
  • Time – 10:45AM
  • Room: East Meeting Room 8 (VCC)
  • Paper: Life during Wartime: Children, Violence, and Security at Morton Village
  • Role: Co-author (Jennifer Bengtson, Jodie O’Gorman, and Amy Michael)

Dr. Heather Walder

Saturday –

  • Lightning Rounds: Enduring Culture History: Constructions of Past Communities and Identities in the Twenty-First Century
  • Time – 8:00AM – 10:00AM
  • Room: East Meeting Room 15 (VCC)
  • Role: Moderator & Discussant
  • Poster Session: North America, Midwest I
  • Time – 2:00PM – 4:00PM
  • Room: East Exhibit Hall B Poster Entrance (VCC)
  • Poster: Compositional Analysis of Copper-Base Metal Artifacts from Michigan

Dr. Ethan Watrall

Thursday-

  • Symposium: Methods and Models for Teaching Digital Archaeology and Heritage
  • Time – 8:00am – 11:00 AM
  • Room: East Meeting Room 8 (VCC)
  • Role: Chair
  • Paper: “Building Scholars and Communities of Practice in Digital Heritage and Archaeology” (10:30 AM)

Saturday –

  • Forum: Current Challenges in Using 3D Data in Archaeology
  • Time – 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
  • Room: East Meeting Room 5 (VCC)
  • Role: Discussant

See you in Vancouver!

 

 

 

 

MSU @ AAA 2016

The annual American Anthropological Association meeting begins this week in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We have several presentations, sessions, forums, and workshops involving members of the MSU Anthropology program. Check out the presentations listed below in alphabetical order of lead presenter. The full searchable schedule can be viewed here.  If I have missed any MSU presenters or organizers please let me know and I will update the list.

MaryKate Bodnar

  • Session: Navigating Biomedical Hegemony and Health Inequalities
  • Friday November 18th, 10:15 AM – 12:00 PM.

Lisa Bright

  • Session: Discovering Evidence of Care from the Four Fields of Anthropology: Health and Reproduction
  • Thursday November 17th, 4:00 PM – 5:45 PM
  • Presentation: Bioarchaeological Evidence of Caregiving from a Historic-Era County Hospital (4:30 PM – 4:45 PM).

Elizabeth Drexler

  • Session: Human Rights Vernacularizations: Celebrating the Work of Sally Merry
  • Saturday November 19th, 8:00 AM – 9:45 AM.

Jennifer Goett (co-organizer Laurie Medina)

  • Session: After Recognition: Indigenous and Afrodescendant Territorial Rights in Latin America (5-0840).
  • Saturday November 20th, 2016. 1:45 PM – 3:30 PM.

Lynne Goldstein

  • Workshop: How (and Whether) to Find an Academic Job
  • Thursday November 17th, 8:00am – 12:00pm.

Lynne Goldstein (with Lisa Bright and Jeff Painter)

  • Session: Ceramic Ecology XXX: Current Advances in Ceramic Research
  • Friday November 18th, 4:00 PM – 5:45 PM.
  • Presentation: Sherds of Spartans Past: Ceramics from the Michigan State University Campus Archaeology Program (4:15PM – 4:30PM)

Rowenn Kalman (co-organizer Michael Walker)

  • Session: Evidence of Inclusion and Equity: Engaged Anthropology and the Sustaining Impact of Anne Ferguson’s Scholarship and Mentorship
  • Friday November 18th, 8:00 AM – 9:45 AM.

Seven Mattes (Organizer: Akihiro Ogawa)

  • Session: Space, Self, and Language in East Asia
  • Sunday November 20th, 10:15 AM – 12:00 PM.

Mindy Morgan (co-organizer Ira Bashkow)

  • Session (Roundtable): Voicing the Ancestors: Readings in Memory of George Stocking (3-0030).
  • Date: Thursday November 17th, 8:00am – 9:45 AM.

Norder John

  • Session: Eco-Subjectives: Resisting Environmental Inequality Through Indigenous and Local Community Coalition-Building
  • Saturday November 19th, 10:15 AM – 11:45 AM
  • Presentation: Rivers of Wisdom, Islands of History: The Poises of Sustainable Indigenous Knowledge Communities through Heritage and Environmental Resource Management (11:15AM – 11:30AM)

Radonic Lucero

  • Session: After Recognition: Indigenous and Afrodescendant Territorial Rights in Latin America
  • Saturday November 19th, 1:45 PM – 3:00 PM
  • Presentation: Whose City? Indigenous Peoples and the Interrogation of Public Space in Northwestern Mexico (2:00 PM – 2:15 PM)

MSU @ SAA2016

SAAhead100

As we do every year, here is a look at the presentations that will be at the Society for American Archaeology’s Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida taking place this week. We have a number of presentations, sessions and forums involving members of the MSU Anthropology program. Check out all the presentations below, in alphabetical order of presenter. Session number for program reference is in brackets.

Dziedzic, Erica [71] (Co-Presenter with Adrianne Daggett)

  • Session: Assessing Outcomes in Public Archaeology: Imperatives, Perils and Frameworks
  • Presentation: Dig the Past: Evaluating a CampusBased Public Archaeology Program
  • Date: Thursday, April 7 at 2-4:45 pm

Goldstein, Lynne [30] (Co-Presenter with Vincas Steponaitis and William Lovis), [48], [116]

  • Session: NAGPRA Applied: Stories from the Field on its 25th Anniversary
  • Presentation: A Brief and True History of SAA’s Involvement with NAGPRA
  • Date: Thursday, April 7 at 9-11:45 am
  • Forum: The Future of American Archaeology: Engage the Voting Public or Kiss Your Research Goodbye!
  • Date: Thursday, April 7 at 1-3 pm
  • Session: Buried, Burned, Bundled and Broken: Approaches to Co-Occurrence of Multiple Methods, Treatments and Styles of Burials Within Past Societies
  • Presentation: Discussant
  • Date: Friday, April 8 at 8-10 am

Lovis, William [30] (Co-Presenter with Vincas Steponaitis and Lynne Goldstein)

  • Session: NAGPRA Applied: Stories from the Field on its 25th Anniversary
  • Presentation: A Brief and True History of SAA’s Involvement with NAGPRA
  • Date: Thursday, April 7 at 9-11:45 am

Meyers Emery, Kathryn [116]

  • Session: Buried, Burned, Bundled and Broken: Approaches to Co-Occurrence of Multiple Methods, Treatments and Styles of Burials Within Past Societies
  • Presentation: Preparing Their Deaths: Examining Variation in Cooccurrence of Cremation and Inhumation in Early Medieval England
  • Date: Friday, April 8 at 8-10 am

Michael, Amy [116] (Co-Presenter with Gabriel Wrobel)

  • Session: Buried, Burned, Bundled and Broken: Approaches to Co-Occurrence of Multiple Methods, Treatments and Styles of Burials Within Past Societies
  • Presentation: Discerning Patterns of Intentional and Unintentional Movement of Human Bones in Maya Caves
  • Date: Friday, April 8 at 8-10 am

Wrobel, Gabriel [116](Co-Presenter with Amy Michael), [158]

  • Session: Buried, Burned, Bundled and Broken: Approaches to Co-Occurrence of Multiple Methods, Treatments and Styles of Burials Within Past Societies
  • Presentation: Discerning Patterns of Intentional and Unintentional Movement of Human Bones in Maya Caves
  • Date: Friday, April 8 at 8-10 am
  • Forum: Presenting the Ancient Mayan in 3D
  • Date: Friday, April 8 at 1-3 pm

CAP Represents at the Midwest Archaeological Conference 2015

This past weekend CAP attended the Midwest Archaeological Conference in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Several grad students and faculty presented their research and represented the outstanding work happening at MSU.

CAP Poster Presentation:

Lisa Bright, Katy Meyers-Emery, and Amy Michaels- More Than Just Nightsoil: Preliminary Findings from Michigan State University’s First Privy – download here

In addition to a poster presentation, Campus Archaeology was excited to be asked to be a part of the Campus Archaeologies in the Midwest Session. Organized by William Green and Shannon Fie from Beloit College, this session explored the variety of archaeology occurring on college campuses throughout the Midwest. Dr. Goldstein presented on CAP, Michigan State University’s Campus Archaeology Program: What We’ve Done and What We’ve Learned. Her presentation explained the successful strategies of CAP and how CAP has culminated into its current position within the university. Dr. Goldstein stressed the importance of creating lasting results within he university, such as the University’s Master Plan.

Lisa Bright, Katy Meyers-Emery, and Kate Frederick presented The Only Things Constant is Change: Maintaining Continuity in the MSU Campus Archaeology Program. One of the major challenges of CAP is the regular turnover in not only the University’s administration, but also the turnover in the position of Campus Archaeologist and CAP fellows. Our presentation explained the mechanisms we have in place to create continuity, i.e. GIS (see Katy’s post), and how we prevent having to reinvent the wheel every year.

Other papers in the session were as follows….

William Green (Beloit College)Archaeology on/off the Campus

Robert Sasso (University of Wisconsin-Parkside)- In the Field Away and at Home: Archaeological Investigations on Two College Campuses in Southeastern Wisconsin

Shannon Fie (Beloit College)- Geophysics at Beloit College: A Tool for Sustaining Campus Archaeology

Mark Schurr (University of Notre Dame)- Exploring the Foundations of University of Notre Dame 2015: The Return to Old College

Darlene Brooks-Hedstrom and Caitlin Lobl (Wittenberg University) Campus Archaeology as a Catalyst for Partnership between Alumni, Students, and the Administration at Wittenberg University

John Doershuk, William Whittaker, and Angela Collins (University of Iowa)- Hubbard Park and Voxman School of Music: Campus Archaeology at the University of Iowa

Russel Skowronek (University of Texas Pan American)- Discussant, MSU Alum, and Co-Author of Beneath the Ivory Tower: The Archaeology of Academia

There were some interesting general topics to take away from the presentations. First of all, archaeology conducted on college campuses is very high profile, and because of this, should be used to its full advantage. For our CAP, hundreds of people pass by our excavations each day, so taking the time to explain why we’re conducting archaeology, and how it effects the larger campus community is integral for sustaining our program. Campus archaeology should involve and invite the entire campus community. Engage not only the current students who happen to stumble past the excavation, but also seek out alumni who potentially have insight about the area, or deep pockets to fund further excavations. Because archaeology can be so hands-on, it’s easy to intrigue a wide range of people, from life-long-learners to toddlers, archaeology can be family friendly and engaging. Campus archaeology has the ability connect students to broader research goals. The presentation by Wittenberg University, explained how one student’s involvement with her campus archaeology program led to further success in studies abroad. Russel Skowronek, the discussant for the session stressed that, while it’s easy for archaeologists to see the advantages of campus archaeology, we need to find ways to ensure that the university understands those advantages.

CAP at the Cultural Landscapes and Heritage Values Conference

This May, the Campus Archaeology fellows will be presenting our research projects at the interdisciplinary Cultural Landscapes and Heritage Values conference held at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. The goal of this conference is to bring together scholars from multiple fields in order to discuss a variety of relating themes regarding issues of social justice and power, authenticity and integrity, tangible and intangible heritage, and sustainability in cultural landscape management.

Our symposium focuses mostly on the latter themes and is titled “Universities as Examples of Cultural Heritage Planning, Understanding Landscapes, and Being Sustainable.” The papers given will discuss the major research projects that CAP has recently worked on. Much of this research has been featured in various blog posts, but these papers will offer a much more broader view on each topic. This first paper describes how Michigan State has integrated sustainable food practices throughout its history through the examination of food production and choices over the course of MSU’s history. Women on campus are also related to changing landscapes through the creation of gendered spaces and the creation of a predictive model. Concepts of authenticity are employed in regards to the “sacred space” on campus and the perceived views of the undisturbed space. And finally, the prehistoric past on campus is explored and how this has shaped further historical developments on campus. All of these presentations will demonstrate how archaeology can benefit and enhance archival materials to help understand our historic past. They also demonstrate the impact and importance of Campus Archaeology to Michigan State University.

As this is not a typical archaeological conference, this will give us an opportunity to interact with scholars from other fields. It will allow us to demonstrate our broad impact on cultural heritage to a wide audience and gain insights on how it is approached and managed in other disciplines. We are also proud to announce that the Heritage Values Interest Group of the Society of American Archaeology has sponsored our session, which is a great honor.

Listed below are the titles of our papers and our abstracts, starting with our symposium abstract:

Universities as Examples of Cultural Heritage Planning, Understanding Landscapes, and Being Sustainable

Organizer: Lynne Goldstein

Land Grant institutions in the U.S. represent places that were originally oriented to educating and training farmers, but even in their growth and expansion, have always been places of reform and experimentation. In that context, this symposium looks at landscape, cultural heritage, planning, and sustainability of one of the pioneer land grant colleges: Michigan State University (MSU). In particular, we use the lens of the MSU Campus Archaeology Program (CAP) to demonstrate how archaeology can contribute to current conversations on major issues of today. CAP uses the past to make the University better stewards, but also to experiment with new approaches, integrate archaeology into planning and training, and bring students and the broader public into discussion of larger issues of heritage and sustainability. Each paper in this session represents one of Campus Archaeology’s major projects.

Created Landscapes, Managing Heritage, Being Sustainable, and Learning from the Past: A Land Grant University and Its Campus Archaeology Program

Lynne Goldstein

The Michigan State University (MSU) Campus Archaeology Program (CAP) has existed for fewer than 10 years, and although we conduct archaeological work prior to University construction, we do much more. We have convinced MSU that it needs to be better stewards of its past, and the University has agreed. We do archaeology prior to ANY campus construction, whether it is a new building or planting a new bush. In addition to acting as stewards of the campus’ past, we focus on training students, engaging the broader community in the importance of the past to the present, and conducting independent research on the past. In 2014, we realized that although we had been well integrated into the university infrastructure system, we were not being included in the planning process. I offered an intensive class on Cultural Heritage Planning, and as a group we drafted a cultural heritage plan for the campus. The possibility of our success was realized when the Planning Office agreed to consider integration of our plan into the new University Master Plan. This paper outlines the process of this planning and some possible broader implications.

How the Michigan State University Campus Archaeology Program Has Examined Sustainability Through Time.

Nicole Geske, Lisa Bright, and Amy Michael

The role of universities in sustainability and cultural landscape management has largely been ignored. However, sustainability can often be studied more effectively at the university level, where there is a microcosm of greater society and its issues. To examine these questions, archival records and archaeology can be used to identify sustainable practices throughout the past using accepted benchmarks of energy, food, and transportation. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, we focus on sustainability of food systems at MSU through time.

As a land grant institution with a focus on agriculture, MSU incorporated food systems into the physical and cultural landscape since its inception. Sustainability in food practices was a large part of this effort, as it was required in order to maintain the campus. This self-reliance on food continued until the student population and surrounding community expanded to the point where it was no longer practical to be the sole producer of food. This change also mirrored larger societal trends where artificial and canned foods became preferred to those grown on campus. The University’s long tradition of food system sustainability allows the connection of historic data to modern trends creating holistic views of changing landscapes.

Understanding and Predicting Gendered Space on the Historic Campus at Michigan State University

Amy Michael and Josh Burbank

Although women were present on the historic campus, they were essentially an appendage to a male-dominated landscape focused on agricultural education. Females were officially admitted by 1870, though geographic isolation and lack of dormitory space ensured that enrollment was low until 1896 when the Home Economics course was created. Historical records demonstrate that during 1900-1925 there was a rapid rise in visibility of female students. Cultural norms of the time were at odds with these “co-eds,” as women were absent from home and pursuing education independently. Writings from memoirs and literary clubs illustrate tensions between the university and females as the administration enacted rules to maintain order on the increasingly integrated campus. Student council records reflect the desires of women to govern themselves, while journals detailed the gendered constraint felt academically and spatially.

We explore questions related to the building, maintaining, and fissioning of gendered space on the historic campus during 1900-1925. Further, archaeological correlates and material culture linked to changing gender roles and expectations will be explored. The combined archival/archaeological approach will allow for the creation of a predictive model of a historic gendered landscape that can inform future excavations by the Campus Archaeology Program.

What Does it Mean to be Sacred? Campus Archaeology, Authenticity and the Sacred Space of MSU

Katy Meyers Emery

Michigan State University’s campus began as a small grouping of buildings within an oak opening, and since the 1870s, when the College President decreed that no further construction was allowed within this central wooded area, it has been known as the “sacred space”. The Campus Archaeology Program has worked diligently since 2005 to investigate and protect the archaeological integrity of this historic portion of campus, and much of our work has been located within this ‘sacred space’. The ‘sacred space’ is perceived as the last historic and authentic feature of MSU’s campus, which has led to the it being discussed as a static preserved landscape- a perception that we too as the archaeologists on campus have perpetuated to some extent. However, despite being ‘sacred’, construction and reconstruction of the space has continued at a steady pace throughout the over 150 years of campus life. This paper investigates the manner in which the ‘sacred space’ has been treated and perceived in the past and today, the authenticity of its modern description and perception, and how we as archaeologists promote the protection and integrity of the space, while also addressing the changes of this living landscape, both the tangible and intangible.

Reading between the Lines: How MSU Campus Archaeology Evaluates the Past

Blair Zaid and Kate Frederick

This paper investigates both the tangible and intangible heritage of Michigan State University’s campus. The priority of historical heritage at MSU creates a silence of the multiple influences of the development of the campus, specifically the ‘Sacred Space.’ The ‘Sacred Space’ a designated area in the oldest part of campus now set aside for its aesthetic charms, has evidence for a prehistoric site dating to 3000 B.P. This paper posits that prehistoric and early historic land use by Native American populations over time influenced how the ‘Sacred Space’ was formed during the construction and protection of the space.  Using archaeological, geological, historical, and ethnohistorical information, this paper aims to interpret elements of the prehistoric landscape to better understand the multiple influences that helped shape the ‘Sacred Space.’ This project will ultimately help the MSU Campus Archaeology Program construct a Cultural Heritage Management Plan for the University and ‘unsilence’ the overlooked contributions of prehistoric Native American populations to the changing landscape of MSU.

Anthropology Students Present at UURAF 2015

Friday I had the privilege of evaluating the Anthropology section of the University Undergraduate Research and Arts Forum (UURAF) in the MSU Union. I was very impressed with the quality of research and the ability of each presenter to discuss their project goals and outcomes. Each student presented quality original research that certainly speaks to the dedication they brought to their projects! I snapped a couple pictures at each poster:

 

Josh Schnell

Josh Schnell

Josh Schnell pulled double duty and presented on Mississippian landscapes and 3D cranial modeling techniques. He was able to determine new information about gravel use at Aztalan which again underscores the unique nature of the site. His research into 3D modeling answers important questions about whether this new technology gives us similar data when compared to traditional methods.

Taylor

Taylor Flaherty

 

Taylor Flaherty examined sexual dimporphism in a small sample using the mandible as her data source. This research is particularly important when considering bioarchaeological samples that are poorly preserved and unable to be sexed using traditional methods.

Alison Appland

Allison Apland

Allison Apland presented a very interesting project about food insecurity in a population of breastfeeding women in Northern Kenya. Her work examines how women cope with food insecurity and how those strategies affect dietary quality and health. This project has important implications across sub-disciplines in physical, cultural, and medical anthropology.

Kyla Cools

Kyla Cools

Kyla Cools looked at a little-used data source, traditional Native American craftwork quilts, to understand patterns and variations that may point to aspects of cultural identity and change through time. Her findings were very interesting and she spoke eloquently about how she thinks scholars should begin to use utilitarian pieces like quilts in their understanding of Native cultures, memory, and representation.

Rebecca Alpert

Rebecca Alpert

Rebecca Alpert relayed her research on using charred food remains on ceramics to understand Middle Woodland dietary choices. This research begins the first lines of inquiry into how Upper Peninsula populations were cooking and eating some 2000 years ago.

 

MSU at the Society for American Archaeology 2015

In a couple weeks, from April 15 to April 18, the Society for American Archaeology Annual Conference will be occurring in San Francisco, CA. There is going to be great representation of members of Campus Archaeology and the MSU Anthropology Department.

Daggett, Adrianne

[140] SYMPOSIUM: CHRONOLOGY, EXCHANGE, IDENTITY: ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF GLASS BEADS FOR ASSESSING REGIONAL INTERACTION

  • Room: Continental Parlor 3
  • Date and Time:Thursday, April 16, 6:00 PM – 8:30 PM
  • Role: Chair

Frederick, Kathryn

[139] GENERAL SESSION: EXPERIMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY

  • Room: Golden Gate 4
  • Date and Time: Thursday, April 16, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
  • Role: Presenter (7:oo PM)- Holes: The Beginners Guide to Food Caching (received Honorable Mention for the SAA Student Paper Award)

Goldstein, Lynne

[71] FORUM: GENDER DISPARITIES IN RESEARCH GRANT SUBMISSIONS (Sponsored by SAA Board of Directors)

  • Room: Continental Parlor 2
  • Date and Time: Thursday, April 16, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
  • Role: Moderator and Discussant

[235] SYMPOSIUM: CURRENT PRACTICE IN DIGITAL PUBLIC & COMMUNITY ARCHAEOLOGY

  • Room: Union Square 13
  • Date and Time: Friday, April 17, 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
  • Role: Presenter (2:30 PM)- Digital Public Archaeology Reconsidered: Lessons from Michigan State University’s Campus Archaeology Program

[301] SYMPOSIUM: PEOPLE THAT NO ONE HAD USE FOR, HAD NOTHING TO GIVE TO, NO PLACE TO OFFER: THE MILWAUKEE COUNTY INSTITUTION GROUNDS POOR FARM CEMETERY

  • Room: Continental Ballroom Parlor 8
  • Date and Time: Saturday, April 18, 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
  • Role: Discussant

Kooiman, Susan

[280] SYMPOSIUM: GREAT LAKES ARCHAEOLOGY: CURRENT RESEARCH AND PERSPECTIVES

  • Room: Yosemite A
  • Date and Time: Saturday, April 18, 8:00 AM – 10:30 AM
  • Role: Presenter (9:00 AM)- Pottery Function, Cooking, and Subsistence in the Upper Great Lakes: A View from the Middle Woodland Winter Site in Northern Michigan

Meyers Emery, Katy

[5] FORUM: DIVERSE DIGITAL ARCHAEOLOGIES – A CAA-NA & DDIG EVENT (Sponsored by DDIG and CAA-NA)

  • Room: Union Square 25
  • Date and Time: Thursday, April 16, 8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
  • Role: Discussant

Schnell, Joshua

[204] POSTER SESSION: ADVANCES IN BIOARCHAEOLOGICAL METHODS

  • Room: Grand Ballroom A
  • Date and Time:Friday, April 17, 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM
  • Role: Presenter- Three-Dimensional Osteometry: A Comparative Study of 3D Model Generation Techniques for Cranial Osteometry

Watrall, Ethan

[200] SYMPOSIUM: MACROSCOPIC APPROACHES TO ARCHAEOLOGICAL HISTORIES: INSIGHTS INTO ARCHAEOLOGICAL PRACTICE FROM DIGITAL METHODS

  • Room: Golden Gate 3
  • Date and Time: Friday, April 17, 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
  • Role: Discussant

[235] SYMPOSIUM: CURRENT PRACTICE IN DIGITAL PUBLIC & COMMUNITY ARCHAEOLOGY

  • Room: Union Square 13
  • Date and Time: Friday, April 17, 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
  • Role: Chair and Presenter (1:30 PM)- MBRIA: A Platform to Build, Serve, and Manage Mobile Public Heritage Experiences

Poster Session Featuring Jodie O’Gorman, Frank Raslich, Nicole Raslich, Nicole Silva, Andrew Upton and Jessica Yann

[365] POSTER SESSION: NEGOTIATING MIGRATION AND VIOLENCE IN THE PRE-COLUMBIAN MID-CONTINENT

  • Room: Grand Ballroom A
  • Date and Time:Saturday, April 18, 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
  • Poster Presentations

365-a Jodie OGorman, Michael Conner and Nicole Silva—Negotiating Migration and Violence in the Pre-Columbian Mid-Continent: A View from the Village

365-b Timothy Horsley, Michael Conner and Jodie O’Gorman— Understanding Settlement Organization through Geophysical Survey at the Morton Village Site, IL

365-c Andrew Upton, Jodie O’Gorman, Michael Conner and Terrance Martin—The Role of Public Space in Identity Making at Morton Village (11F2) 304 Program of the 80th Annual Meeting Saturday Afternoon, April 18

365-d Jessica Yann, Jeff Painter and Michael Conner—The Spatial Distribution of Domestic Facilities in the Multiethnic Morton Village Site

365-e Michael Conner, Jodie O’Gorman and Nicole Silva—Introduction to the DMM-MSU Morton Village Project 365-f Ryan Maureen Tubbs, Jodie A. O’Gorman, Jeffrey M. Painter and Terrance J. Martin—Negotiating Identity through Food Choice in the Pre-Columbian Mid-Continent

365-g Frank Raslich, Jodie O’Gorman and Michael Conner—Coming Together: Evidence of Ritual and Public Space as a Mechanism of Social Integration

365-h Jennifer Bengtson, Jeffrey Painter, Frank Raslich, Nikki Silva and Andrew Upton—Migration and Cohabitation at Morton Village: Future Research Directions

Campus Archaeology and MSU Anthropology at SAA 2014

Screen Shot 2014-04-16 at 10.41.16 AM

Next week from Thursday, April 24 to Sunday, April 27, the Society for American Archaeology will be occurring in Austin, TX. There is going to be great representation of members of Campus Archaeology and the MSU Anthropology department.

Want to learn more about MSU Campus Archaeology? Do you have a program like Campus Archaeology at your university?

We are hosting an informal gathering at the SAAs to discuss all things campus archaeology! Kate, the Campus Archaeologist, and other members of the team will be there for this gathering.

  • When: Thursday (April 24th), 4-6pm
  • Where: Hilton Garden Inn, Red River Room

We also have numerous presentations, sessions and forums led by members of the MSU Anthropology program. Check out all the presentations below, in alphabetical order of presenter. Session number for program reference is in brackets.

Brock, Terry [258]

  • Session- Blogging Archaeology, Again
  • Presentation- SHA Social: Developing a 21st century Social Media Strategy for the Society for Historical Archaeology
  • Saturday, April 26, Room: 9B (ACC)Time: 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Burbank, Joshua [303]

  • Session- Lighting Dark Passages Part 2: Celebrating 30 Years of James E. Brady’s Contribution to Cave Archaeology
  • Presentation- Interpreting a Specialized Cache of Human Remains in Actun Kabul, Central Belize
  • Thursday, April 24, Room: 12AB (ACC), Time: 1:00 PM – 4:45 PM

Daggett, Adrianne [58]

  • Session- Worlds at Different Scales: Population Interactions and Dynamics Over Time in Africa
  • Presentation- The View from Bluff’s Edge: South Sowa, Botswana in the Early Iron Age
  • Thursday, April 24, Room: 17A (ACC) Time: 1:00 PM – 3:30 PM

Deskaj, Sylvia [64], [89], [303]

  • Session- Establishing a Bioarchaeology of Community
  • Presentation- The Walking Dead: Establishing and Maintaining Community in Northern Albania
  • Thursday, April 24, Room: 17B (ACC) Time: 1:00 PM – 4:15 PM
  • Session- Europe During the Bronze Age, Iron Age and Viking Age
  • Co-Presentation- The 2013 Field Season of the Projekti Arkeologjikë i Shkodrës (PASH), Northern Albania
  • Thursday, April 24, Room: 8A (ACC) Time: 3:15 PM – 5:00 PM
  • Session Organizer: The Link Between Mortuary Analysis and Advances in Scientific Methods: Developing Cultural Context
  • Co- Presentation- Exploring the Relationship Between  Sampling Loci and Developmental Age in Isotopic Studies of Human Teeth: A Pilot Study from Kamenica, Albania
  • Saturday, April 26, Room: 16A (ACC) Time: 2:45 PM – 5:00 PM

Dunham, Sean [34]

  • Session- Archaeological Studies in Settlement Ecology: Recent Advances from the Americas
  • Presentation- An Analysis of Late Woodland Archaeological Site Locations in the Eastern Upper Peninsula of Michigan
  • Thursday, April 24, Room: 11AB (ACC) Time: 9:15 AM – 12:00 PM

Goldstein, Lynne [64], [184], [303]

  • Session- Establishing a Bioarchaeology of Community
  • Co- Presentation- Emblematic Identities of the Effigy Mound Manifestation: Symbolic Patterns
  • Thursday, April 24, Room: 17B (ACC) Time: 1:00 PM – 4:15 PM
  • Forum: Gender Disparities in Research Grant Submissions
  • Friday, April 25, Room: 8A (ACC) Time: 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
  • Session Organizer: The Link Between Mortuary Analysis and Advances in Scientific Methods: Developing Cultural Context
  • Presentation- Discussant
  • Saturday, April 26, Room: 16A (ACC) Time: 2:45 PM – 5:00 PM

Kooiman, Susan [48]

  • Session- Great Lakes
  • Presentation- A Multidimensional Approach to Functional Pottery Analysis: A Case Study in the Upper Great Lakes of North America
  • Thursday, April 24, Room: 9A (ACC) Time: 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Lovis, William [73], [229], [261]

  • Session- New World Ceramics
  • Co- Presentation- An Empirical Test of Shell Tempering as a Proto-Hominy Processor
  • Saturday, April 26, Room: 11AB (ACC) Time: 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
  • Session Organizer: Marking the Land: Hunter-Gatherer Creation of Meaning Within Their Surroundings
  • Thursday, April 24, Room: 13AB (ACC) Time: 1:15 PM – 4:30 PM
  • Forum- Error, Sensitivity Analysis and Uncertainty in Archaeological Computational Modeling
  • Saturday, April 26, Room: 8B (ACC) Time: 8:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Meyers, Katy [36], [258]

  • Session Organizer- Place and Space in a Digital Landscape: New Perspectives on Analyzing and Sharing Geospatial Data in Archaeology
  • Presentation- Linking the Spaces of Resting Places: GIS, Anglo-Saxon Archaeology and Linked Open Data
  • Thursday, April 24, Room: 13AB (ACC) Time: 9:45 AM – 12:00 PM
  • Session- Blogging Archaeology, Again
  • Presentation- Discussant
  • Saturday, April 26, Room: 9B (ACC)Time: 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
  • DDIG Lightning Talk
  • Friday, April 25, Room: 414 (HA) Time: 12:45 PM – 1:30PM

Michael, Amy [70], [303]

  • Session- The Link Between Mortuary Analysis and Advances in Scientific Methods: Developing Cultural Context
  • Presentation- Exploring the Relationship Between  Sampling Loci and Developmental Age in Isotopic Studies of Human Teeth: A Pilot Study from Kamenica, Albania
  • Saturday, April 26, Room: 16A (ACC) Time: 2:45 PM – 5:00 PM
  • Session- Lighting Dark Passages Part 2: Celebrating 30 Years of James E. Brady’s Contribution to Cave Archaeology
  • Co-Presentation- Interpreting a Specialized Cache of Human Remains in Actun Kabul, Central Belize
  • Thursday, April 24, Room: 12AB (ACC), Time: 1:00 PM – 4:45 PM

O’Gorman, Jodie [306]

  • Co-Presentation- Ethnicity and Childhood at Morton Village
  • Session- Bioarchaeology in North America
  • Saturday, April 26, Room: 8B (ACC) Time: 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM

Pollard, Helen [254]

  • Session- City, Craft and Residence in Mesoamerica: Research Papers presented in Honor of Dan M. Helen
  • Presentation- Tula of the Toltecs and Tzintzuntzan of the Tarascans
  • Saturday, April 26, Room: 9C (ACC) Time: 9:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Upton, Andrew [261]

  • Session- New World Ceramics
  • Presentation- An Empirical Test of Shell Tempering as a Proto-Hominy Processor
  • Saturday, April 26, Room: 11AB (ACC) Time: 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Watrall, Ethan [215]

  • Session Organizer- Heritage Management
  • Presentation- msu.seum: a model for mobile public heritage and archaeology
  • Friday, April 25, Room: 8A (ACC), Time: 3:15 PM – 5:00 PM
  • Session Organizer- SAA DDIG Digital Archaeology Projects Lightning Talks session
  • Friday, April 25, Room: 414 (HA) Time: 12:45 PM – 1:30PM

Wrobel, Gabriel [70], [335]

  • Session- Lighting Dark Passages Part 2: Celebrating 30 Years of James E. Brady’s Contribution to Cave Archaeology
  • Co-Presentation- Interpreting a Specialized Cache of Human Remains in Actun Kabul, Central Belize
  • Co-Presentation- A New Approach for Calculation of MNI in Commingled Remains: Mortuary Analysis of Caves Branch Rockshelter, Belize
  • Thursday, April 24, Room: 12AB (ACC), Time: 1:00 PM – 4:45 PM
  • Session: Multi-Scalar Approaches to Archaeological Interpretation
  • Presentation: Understanding the Multi-Scalar Complexity in Archaeological Skeletal Collections and Its Implications for Analysis
  • Sunday, April 27, Room: 9B (ACC) Time: 8:00 AM – 11:30 AM

CAP at the UURAF

Morrill Hall postcard, via MSU Archives and Historical Records

With the semester coming quickly to a close, so is my research on the Women’s Building, otherwise known as Morrill Hall.  I’ve spent all year finding out as much as I can about the beginning of the life of that “good ol’ red building” that sits on the north-east side of Michigan State’s campus.  Spending a lot of time at the MSU Archives (a big thanks to those at the Archives who helped me) I focused on the years between 1900 and 1925 (1900 being the year the Women’s Building was constructed). I found out some pretty interesting facts about not only the building, but the women who lived inside the building.  These women were pioneers; the first to enter a school full of men and to prove that co-education was the next step in university education.

However, if you want to know more about what I’ve found out at the MSU Archives, you’ll have to stop by the MSU Union on Friday, April 12th at around 9:30am, where I’ll be presenting at the UURAF.  The University Undergraduate Research and Arts Forum is held in the spring of every year for undergraduate Michigan State students to show the rest of the school what research they have been conducting all year.  Research can be presented either orally, on a poster, or performed (for those students showcasing their scholarship through artistic work, such as dance, music or theater).  There are twenty research categories total, ranging from Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (be sure look for my friend Matt Smith’s poster!), to Psychology, to Social Science, which will be the category in which I’ll be presenting.  Presenters will be asked questions on their research, and constructive feedback will be given by the judges.  Judging happens throughout the day, and is based on certain criteria, such as delivery, elements and visual aids.  Last year five hundred and sixty students presented at the forum, and I have no doubt there will be even more students this year.

For my research, my mentors, Dr. Lynne Goldstein and Katy Meyers, and I decided that a poster would be the best approach for my presentation.  To be honest, designing the poster was harder than I had anticipated.  It’s all designed on the computer, and PowerPoint is used for this.  However, PowerPoint must be set to certain dimensions (40” by 32”), so trying to view the whole poster on my tiny laptop screen was, well, inconvenient to say the least (as some of my friends would say, “first world problems”). Anyway, I eventually got all of my information placed on the poster only to realize, with the help of Katy, that it was extremely cluttered and disorganized.  So, back to square one, I had to reorder and re-place everything, but eventually I got it to look presentable.  The poster is in the process of being printed, and will be ready to go Friday morning.

So come on by to the MSU Union this Friday, to not only see some pretty interesting research on Morrill Hall (if I do say so myself), but also a lot of pretty incredible research from my undergraduate peers at MSU.  It’ll be an all day event, so even if you can’t make it at 9:30am for my presentation, there will be plenty of other chances during the day to see other presentations.  Come support all of MSU’s undergraduate researchers, and I hope to see you there!

Make sure to visit our interns at the UURAF this Friday, April 12th! At 9:30am in the Gold Room at the MAC Union, Bethany will be presenting her poster on Morrill Hall, and Katie and Dana will be presenting on their classification of the Saints Rest material. Feel free to visit and ask them questions about their research.

For more on the UURAF, visit: http://urca.msu.edu/uuraf/

 

Campus Archaeology at GAC

This Friday, Sabrina Perlman and Katy Meyers will be presenting a poster on behalf of Campus Archaeology at the Graduate Academic Conference hosted by the Council of Graduate Students here at MSU’s Kellogg Hotel Conference Center. This is the fifth year of the GAC, a cross-disciplinary and multi-institutional conference that promotes innovation, collaboration, and professionalization.  Over the past four years, the GAC has provided a great great opportunity for graduate and professional students to come together, share research, and initiate discussion and feedback. It also provides a space for networking, recognizing outstanding achievements, and receiving critique of ideas in a constructive environment. It allows for collaborative work between students and faculty and between research institutions. The keynote speaker is Michael Sharber from Western Michigan University, co-founder of GreenLancer Energy Inc. The presentation schedule and more information about the GAC is located here.

This conference is the perfect opportunity for Sabrina to introduce the Heart of Campus project she has been working on since last semester. The poster being presented is entitled, “The Heart of Michigan State University’s Campus: Investigation of MSU’s Changing Landscape, Identity and Priorities.” It essentially asks the question, “Where is the Heart of Campus?” both today and throughout history. Campus Archaeology Program has divided the first 100 years of MSU’s campus into four thematic time periods using archaeological and archival evidence. These time periods represent different stages of campus development in relation to the shifting focus of the college and greater social processes. The purpose of these groupings is to demonstrate shifts in foci and development into MSU. For each period, there is a central location that represents the Heart of Campus, the space where students and faculty convened together, reflecting their sense of place and their identity as a college. As we examine the previous centers of campus and how they reveal the different focal points of MSU’s evolving landscape which correlate with the historical, educational, and regional realities of each period, we are interested in what current students consider the Heart of Campus today and what that means for our collective identity.

Each time period and respective Heart of Campus is determined by archival and archaeological resources that demonstrate what people were experiencing in the greater world and on campus and how these shaped interactions with the MSU landscape and buildings. These centers are as follows: 1855-1870- College Hall and Saints’ Rest, 1870-1900- The Sacred Space, 1900-1925- Red Cedar River, and 1925-1955- Beaumont Tower. Where is the Heart of Campus today? Students will be asked to pinpoint with a sticker on a current map of MSU which location or space on campus represents their collective identity and the interactions of the college with the greater world. If you are interested to see why these locations were the Heart of Campus for these periods and the shifts in identity that the campus was undergoing at each time, come visit the poster on Friday, February 15 from 1-3 pm. We would love to hear your feedback on our categorizations and your perspectives on today’s Heart of Campus and the future trajectory of our institution.

With the help of director Dr. Goldstein and Campus Archaeologist Katy Meyers, working on this poster presentation has been a focusing force for Sabrina in her project and has enabled her to look at the data concisely and categorize the information thematically. This will be invaluable to the completion of her collaborative paper on the Heart of Campus for Campus Archaeology Program and hopefully demonstrate the importance of our work at MSU.