Tag: Digital archaeology

Furthering Open Archaeology: Development of the CAP Digital Repository

Furthering Open Archaeology: Development of the CAP Digital Repository

In our previous blog, Jeff Bennett introduced the concept of Open Archaeology and some of the ways that Campus Archaeology (CAP) is maintaining and furthering our position within the framework of Open Archaeology. One of the ways in which we plan to further our efforts…

My 3D artifact Odyssey: Introduction to MSU LEADR

My 3D artifact Odyssey: Introduction to MSU LEADR

Last semester I began a quest to create 3D renditions of some of our artifacts and display them ever so eloquently on the CAP website. As mentioned in my previous posts, I used 123D Catch, a free photogrammetry application that can be used right on your…

Introduction to Archaeology Blogs

Introduction to Archaeology Blogs

There are hundreds of archaeology blogs, lists of active blogs are compiled (http://anthropologyreport.com/anthropology-blogs-2014/), individual blog posts are collected (http://dougsarchaeology.wordpress.com/2014/10/05/around-the-archaeology-blog-o-sphere-digest-5/), and RSS feeds are inundated. But if you’re new to anthropology, or specifically archaeology blogging, where’s a good place to start? I thought I’d share some information regarding a few of the archaeology themed blogs I have in my RSS feed.

Society for Historical Archaeologyhttp://www.sha.org/blog/

The SHA blog covers a number of diverse topics, but the thing to focus on are their blog series. Throughout the year they focus on specific themes and events, such as the current membership series will allows current SHA members to share their thoughts on the SHA, as well as their experiences in historical archaeology. They also continued their #TechWeek tradition, highlighting technology use by practicing archaeologists. This series allows members to share new and emerging technological methodology with the larger membership group, many of whom may not be as familiar with the technology in use today.

Middle Savageryhttp://middlesavagery.wordpress.com

Middle Savagery is written by Dr. Colleen Morgan, who is currently the EUROTAST Marie Curie Research Fellow at the University of York. Middle Savagery was started in 2004 (10 years of publishing is a long time in the blog-o-sphere) and covers topics relating to Dr. Morgan’s research on “building archaeological narratives with digital media”, as well as current topics of discussion in the field. She is also a contributor to the Punk Archaeology book I previously reviewed.

Savage Mindshttp://savageminds.org/

Although Savage Minds bills itself as a group blog that writes about sociocultural anthropology, the topics are often applicable to archaeology. They are currently on the tail end of their Fall Writers series where a guest post is published every Monday. It is viewed as a place to initiate conversation about writing, and to critically analyze the how, why, and what of anthropological writing.

Drunk Archaeology Podcasthttp://drunkarchaeology.tumblr.com

Drunk Archaeology is a very new podcast, that currently has two episode available for download. They are attempting to take the casual, rowdy nature of a group of archaeologist at the bar, and present it to a larger audience while covering topics like looting/illicit trade and the archaeology of Pompeii. Although some of the language could be considered NSFW, if you’ve got a good sense of humor and love archaeology take a listen.

Electric Archaeologyhttp://electricarchaeology.ca

Electric Archaeology is written by Dr. Shawn Graham, who is currently an associate professor of humanities at Carleton University. The blog focuses on his interest in digital media as a teaching tool, and his current research in history and archaeology.

 

If any of these blogs interest you, I also recommend following the authors on Twitter.

Campus Archaeology & Social Media: What We’ve Learned Over the Past Seven Years

Campus Archaeology & Social Media: What We’ve Learned Over the Past Seven Years

Since its official beginnings in 2007, social media has played an important role in the management of and education about cultural heritage on campus. Social media is part of a larger multifaceted communication plan that has been developed as part of this program for multiple…

3-D Artifacts and Digital Archaeology: A Match Made in the Clouds??

3-D Artifacts and Digital Archaeology: A Match Made in the Clouds??

     Greetings and happy Fall 2014! This summer I was fortunate to participate in Dr. Goldstein’s Cultural Heritage management class which introduced me to a wide range of topics in creating long terms plans for the promotion, conservation, and preservation of sites across the…

Archaeology 101: GIS

Archaeology 101: GIS

This year my Campus Archaeology Program project is going to be incorporating information from recent Field School’s into the pre-existing GIS map made of the Campus. This will include mapping Shovel Test Pit and excavation location and detail information. The ultimate goal of this project is to integrate all the previously gathered data obtained during CAP excavations and Field Schools to determine the predictability of finding artifacts at specific locations on campus.

GIS stands for Geographic Information System and works as a means of storing, analyzing, and displaying digitized data in a spatially meaningful way. This means that a wide variety of data can be mapped spatially including cartographic information and statistical information. This allows maps to be developed not only in a two dimensional way with street and building information, but also three dimensionally with elevation and topographic information. Statistics can also be incorporated into this as well, for example, allowing mapping of different demographics.

Raster and Vector Model

Data is put into digital form through two main types of data storage, raster and vectors. A raster is a pixel. The data is stored is rows and columns of cells. Each cell, or pixel, is assigned a value that could be anything from elevation, temperature, land use, etc. All these pixels come together to form a larger image. The value of storing data in raster cells is that is allows data to be displayed continuously, for example, elevation models are best displayed as a raster model because it allows for discreet continuous changes in elevation to be shown.

Vectors are a way of displaying data in three different types. Points, which allow for representation objects that require only a single point reference. Another data illustration that vectors allow for are lines, which allow for information such as roads, rivers, and topographic lines to be displayed one-dimensionally. The final type of data display is polygons, which allow for two-dimensional image depiction. Vector is usually seen in more in illustrating roads, lakes, sites, and other information in polygons.

When we use GIS at Campus Archaeology, we use both raster and vector layers. For aerial photos or elevation models we use vector data because it creates pictures. For information about the campus itself and our sites we create vector data. By combining the two we can create a model of campus that we can analyze.